Animation That's Out Of This World!

Archive for September, 2015

An Exo Squad Birthday!!

exosquad_celMy beautiful Wife just got me this original Exo Squad animation cel for my birthday!!  Original art work from an excellent underrated animated series about the domination of earth by the Neosapians a cloned race of blue beings that we created for slave labor.  Mature themes, excellent voice acting, and intergalactic continuing story lines that advances the plot to a cliffhanger that made you wanting more.  It lasted only 2 seasons, but how I wish there was a third season to wrap things up.

From wikipedia:

Exosquad is an American animated television series created by Universal Cartoon Studios as a response to Japanese anime.[3] The show is set in the beginning of the 22nd century and covers the interplanetary war between humanity and Neosapiens, a fictional race artificially created as workers/slaves for the Terrans. The narrative generally follows Able Squad, an elite Terran unit of mecha pilots, on their missions all over the Solar System, although other storylines are also abundant. The series ran for two complete seasons in syndication from 1993 to 1994, and was cancelled after one third-season episode had been produced. Reruns later aired on Universal-owned USA Network. The music from the show was used in the third season of the paranormal series Sightings as additional background score.”

Reception

The critical reception of Exosquad was generally positive, as it was described as “no ordinary cartoon”, “truly a superb piece of work”, “a kind show that [one]’ll never forget”, and “one of the greatest anime epics ever made”. Phil Summers of Shamoozal.com commented that while “the early 90s wasn’t exactly the best time for cartoons”, Exosquad was “one of the most underrated cartoon series of all time”. Summers spoke highly of its “serious, ongoing storyline”, complimenting the maturity of raised themes, and denoted the decision to cancel it despite the rising popularity as “weird”. Likewise, Thomas Wheeler of MasterCollector.com described the abrupt ending as “a VERY frustrating cliff-hanger”. Both Summers and Wheeler praised the quality of the toy line that accompanied the series.TG Moses of Evabeast.com pointed out that the two main strengths of Exosquad are its “phenomenal” story and its characters. Like Phil Summers, he complimented the mature themes (such as racism, religion, and politics), calling the show “thought provoking and inspiring” with “an incredible amount of depth” in it. Moses specifically praised the characterization of the Neosapien characters, which avoided “absolute good and evil” designations, and voice acting in the show, wherein he perceived it “better than everyone else”. Both Will Meugniot and Michael Edens commented that Exosquad was the best show they have worked on.

Gord Lacey of TVShowsOnDVD.com reviewed the first season upon its DVD release and likewise praised the maturity and complexity of the show, which subverted his expectations. He criticized the occasionally blurry visuals and too quiet audio of the release, rating them both 7/10. Lacey named the absence of DVD extras as a possible source of disappointment for the fans of the show.

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Death of 2D Animation?

Recently, I got this email from animator Terrence Walker at StudioArtFX. He does bring up some interesting points. However, I look at the proliferation of 2D animation on the internet and see a new frontier. One that hasn’t totally been exploited yet. With PBS stating that over 30% of children are finding their content on the internet, 2D may have found a new distribution market. The question becomes, how can artists and animators monetize from it to continue creating content? Can animators create television or film quality animation and distribute it through the internet in a cost effective and timely manner? Are skills being lost or are they transforming and adapting to a new medium of distribution?

What do you think?

Here’s Terrence’s editorial. And check out his tutorials and “anigen” shows at www.studioartfx.com

Miyazaki Was Right. 2D Will Die!
I was putting off writing this message because it makes me angry even to think about this issue. Then, someone went and posted a quote on Facebook that got me into wanting to write about this. I figured better here than in a comment which will be lost in a sea of meaningless traffic. The quote goes:
“…it’s important to keep passing it (knowledge and inspiration of 2D animation) on, even though there’s not a huge studio anymore – at least in this country, in the U.S., who does these kind of films – you never know where it’s gonna go. 
Just going back to when I started at the studio in 1980, it looked pretty bad then, too. It looked horrible, because THE FOX AND THE HOUND came out, did okay business, BLACK CAULDRON flopped, and it looked horrible for 2D animation and they had meetings upstairs about folding the department then, in the early 80’s and so, to see it swing, and come back, in this glorious way, that we were all a part of – it was kind of surreal, that this actually happened, from almost dying to almost staging a full comeback, and it can happen again. I’m telling you, it can happen again.“ – Andreas Deja
Unfortunately it may very well NOT happen again. The reason won’t be because of the financial aspects. It will be because, as Miyazaki said, the skill to do so will be lost. Miyazaki believes it is already lost! He says most animation out there is garbage because the skill with the pencil is gone. How can this be true?
I was watching some modern anime films recently, and it suddenly hit me. Anything which would be even remotely difficult to draw is done in 3D cel shading now. ANYTHING. When was the last time you saw a car, bus or plane fully hand drawn? Compare that to Akira, in 1988, when everything, even the most detailed crumbling building, was hand drawn. These things are done in CGI now for time and cost saving reasons, I know, but the skill to draw it is being lost as a result. Yes, there are guys who can still do it, but they are all getting old. Is the skill being passed on?

「akira tetsuo」の画像検索結果

Young people are learning 3D and going into games because 2D animation doesn’t pay well. You can’t even make a living wage working for a studio in 2D animation. You have artists living four to a room, packed like sardines into a box in a high rent district in Tokyo. Did you know even a successful director makes about the same as a minimum wage worker at McDonalds in the USA? They don’t own the rights nor profit from their creations after all.
For years, studios in Japan and the US have been outsourcing the “grunt work”, and it is sad that it is even considered grunt work, of 2D animation, to studios in Korea, and then China. Interestingly, we are seeing some incredible 2D skill popping up in China. In a recent trailer, I saw this amazingly detailed, fully hand drawn dragon that blew my mind. Unfortunately, it is already becoming evident that these movies can’t make money in the local market. College age students realise that you can’t get a job in this industry, and so everyone is learning 3D and going into games, where there is a new startup every few days. In the countries DOING the outsourcing, artists only need to focus on design, since the actual 2D animation work is being done elsewhere. As a result, the skill is being lost.
And then there is Flash.

「Archer cartoon」の画像検索結果

I’m not even going to talk about that.

「akira tetsuo」の画像検索結果

When you watch a film like Akira, I think there is a certain awe that comes with the knowledge that someone draw that amazing thing you’re seeing. Even though modern cel shading has gotten really good, and it is sometimes difficult to tell the difference, there is something missing when you watch it moving on screen. It’s that awe. The same as the difference between a 007 film, where the car stunt is real, versus a Fast and Furious film where it is obviously CGI, even though both LOOK very good.
Financial reasons cannot, of course, be ignored. People want to make money and put food on the table so they are going to learn the skills that are in demand or that can make some money. Studios expect a profit on the huge investment they put into making a film. 3D is now much much cheaper than 2D, at least in the higher echelons of quality, and excluding sweat shop labor. All of this is, however, leading to one result. Young people are not learning traditional 2D animation, and they have absolutely no reason to.

Audiences still love 2D, though, so what is one to do? THE INDIE will have to keep it alive. If you have a dream of making your own 2D animation project, make it now. There will be less and less competition.

Click here to learn how to get started: http://www.studioartfx.com

Catch up with you soon,
Terrencehttp://www.studioartfx.com